120 Trivia Questions and Answers For Adults

A game of trivia is always something that excites every adult. 

Right from the art of questioning, followed by a bit of thinking and finally, delivering the right answer – it’s a fun game, isn’t it? 

So, without further ado, why not begin this game of contemplation with this exclusive list of over 120 questions? 

Let’s begin. 

Trivia Questions and Answers For Adults

  1. What is the only mammal capable of true sustained flight and can be found on every continent except Antarctica?

  2. In what year did the Berlin Wall officially begin to fall, marking a significant point in the end of the Cold War?

  3. Which element on the periodic table, essential for life, has the highest melting and boiling points of all the elements?

  4. Name the author of “Invisible Man,” a seminal work in African-American literature, which won the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction in 1953.

  5. The ‘Hundred Years’ War’ was fought between England and France over what principal issue?

  6. What famous speech did Martin Luther King Jr. deliver on August 28, 1963, during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom?

  7. In the field of computer science, what does the acronym “SQL” stand for?

  8. Which planet in our solar system is known for having the most extensive ring system?

  9. Identify the artist who painted “The Starry Night,” one of the most renowned works in Western art.

  10. The Battle of Thermopylae, famously depicted in the film “300,” was fought between which two ancient civilizations?

  11. What is the name of the theory that proposes the universe has been expanding since its inception approximately 13.8 billion years ago?

  12. Who was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and in what field was it awarded?

  13. What is the capital city of New Zealand, often mistaken for Auckland?

  14. The enzyme responsible for converting carbon dioxide into oxygen during photosynthesis is called what?

  15. In Greek mythology, who was condemned to roll a boulder up a hill only for it to roll back down every time it neared the top?

  16. Which ancient civilization is credited with the invention of the wheel around 3500 B.C.?

  17. In literature, who wrote the epic poem “Paradise Lost”, which details the biblical story of the Fall of Man?

  18. What is the chemical symbol for gold, derived from its Latin name ‘aurum’?

  19. Name the composer of the famous four-seasons violin concertos known as “The Four Seasons.”

  20. The Treaty of Versailles was signed in what year, officially ending World War I?

  21. What is the term for the transition point between the Earth’s atmosphere and outer space, often cited at an altitude of 100 kilometers (62 miles)?

  22. Identify the physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, profoundly affecting the study of physics and cosmology.

  23. Which vitamin is crucial for blood clotting and is produced naturally by bacteria in the human gut?

  24. The Rosetta Stone, key to deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs, was written in how many languages?

  25. What is the name of the largest moon of Saturn, discovered by Christiaan Huygens in 1655?

  26. Who was the Roman god of war, often equated with the Greek god Ares?

  27. What is the capital city of Canada, often mistaken for Toronto or Montreal?

  28. Name the scientist who proposed the three laws of motion, forming the basic principles of modern physics.

  29. The Chernobyl disaster occurred in what year, marking one of the worst nuclear disasters in history?

  30. In which ocean is the Mariana Trench, the deepest natural trench in the world, located?

  31. Which famous structure is known as the mausoleum at Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World?

  32. Who composed the music for the iconic ballets “Swan Lake,” “The Nutcracker,” and “Sleeping Beauty”?

  33. The Phoenician alphabet is significant for being one of the earliest known forms of what type of writing system?

  34. What is the largest planet in our solar system, known for its Great Red Spot?

  35. In World War II, what was the code name for the Battle of Normandy, which commenced on D-Day, June 6, 1944?

  36. Name the philosopher who wrote “Republic,” a Socratic dialogue concerning justice and the order and character of the just city-state and the just man.

  37. Which element has the atomic number 1, making it the simplest and lightest element in the universe?

  38. What structure in the human body is responsible for protecting the spinal cord and supporting the head?

  39. Identify the artist who sculpted “David” in 1504, a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture.

  40. The theory of evolution by natural selection was independently conceived by Charles Darwin and which other naturalist?

  41. What is the longest river in the world, flowing through northeastern Africa?

  42. Who is the only U.S. president to have resigned from office?

  43. What is the name of the process by which plants use sunlight to synthesize foods from carbon dioxide and water?

  44. In Greek mythology, who is the goddess of wisdom, courage, and warfare, often associated with the owl?

  45. Which composer, deaf in his later years, is famous for his Ninth Symphony, which includes the “Ode to Joy”?

  46. The Hagia Sophia, a masterpiece of Byzantine architecture, is located in which city, formerly known as Byzantium and later Constantinople?

  47. Who wrote the famous novel “1984”, depicting a dystopian future society?

  48. What element is represented by the atomic number 79 and is valued for its rarity and luster as a precious metal?

  49. Name the first human to journey into outer space, achieving this historic feat in 1961.

  50. The Spanish Armada set sail to invade England in what year during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I?

  51. Who was the ancient Greek physician known as the “Father of Medicine,” after whom the Hippocratic Oath is named?

  52. In which Italian city can you find Leonardo da Vinci’s famous mural, “The Last Supper”?

  53. What is the term for the fear of being out of mobile phone contact, a modern phenomenon reflecting technology’s impact on society?

  54. Identify the only country in the world to have a flag that is not rectangular or square in shape.

  55. Name the author of “Pride and Prejudice,” a classic novel in English literature published in 1813.

  56. Which historical event is marked by the storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789, in Paris?

  57. What is the main ingredient in traditional Japanese miso soup?

  58. Who is known as the “Father of Geometry,” authoring a work that laid the foundations for this branch of mathematics?

  59. The Chunnel, or Channel Tunnel, connects which two countries?

  60. In Norse mythology, who is the god of thunder, often depicted wielding a hammer?

  61. In computer science, what does HTTP stand for, a protocol essential for data communication on the World Wide Web?

  62. Who was the first female Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, often known as the Iron Lady?

  63. The painting “Guernica,” a powerful anti-war statement, was created by which famous 20th-century artist?

  64. What is the smallest bone in the human body, located in the middle ear?

  65. The periodic table of elements was invented by which Russian chemist and inventor in 1869?

  66. Name the longest river in Asia, also known as the Yangtze.
  67. Which musical instrument has 88 keys and is commonly used in a wide range of musical genres?

  68. The ancient city of Petra, known for its rock-cut architecture, is located in which modern-day country?

  69. In mathematics, what is the name for a polygon with eight sides?

  70. Who wrote the play “Hamlet,” one of the most famous works in English literature?

  71. What vitamin is primarily obtained through exposure to sunlight and is vital for maintaining healthy bones?

  72. The Kremlin, a historic fortified complex, is located at the heart of which capital city?

  73. What is the primary gas found in Earth’s atmosphere, making up about 78% of the air’s volume?

  74. Name the scientist who discovered the law of universal gravitation and the laws of motion.

  75. In Greek mythology, who was the god of wine, often associated with festivals and ecstasy?

  76. The Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest coral reef system, is located off the coast of which country?

  77. What is the name of the economic theory that advocates for reducing taxes and decreasing regulation to stimulate economic growth, often associated with Ronald Reagan in the United States?

  78. Who was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean?

  79. Identify the architect who designed the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, famous for its unique spiral design.

  80. The Rosetta Stone was instrumental in deciphering the meanings of what ancient language?

  81. What is the name of the longest wall in the world, often associated with the defense of ancient Chinese states?

  82. The theory of relativity, which introduced the equation E=mc², was developed by which physicist?

  83. Who was the first Roman Emperor, often regarded as the initiator of the period known as the Pax Romana?

  84. In literature, who wrote the dystopian novel “Brave New World”, depicting a future society based on technological advancements?

  85. What is the capital city of Iceland, known for its picturesque landscapes and northern lights?

  86. Name the artist who painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican between 1508 and 1512.

  87. The American Civil War began in what year?

  88. In biology, what is the term for an organism’s complete set of DNA, including all of its genes?

  89. Who composed the famous opera “The Marriage of Figaro,” one of the greatest operas of all time?

  90. The period known as the Renaissance primarily occurred during which centuries?

  91. What large desert is located in Northern Africa and is the third-largest desert in the world after Antarctica and the Arctic?

  92. The Nobel Prizes were established by the will of which inventor and industrialist?

  93. Name the currency used in Japan.

  94. Who was the first woman to become Chancellor of Germany, a position she held from 2005 to 2021?

  95. In the field of psychology, who is known for developing the hierarchy of needs?

  96. What is the tallest mountain in the world when measured from sea level?

  97. Identify the scientist who formulated the principle of buoyancy, often referred to as his namesake principle.

  98. Who wrote “Les Misérables,” a novel set in early 19th-century France?

  99. What is the largest internal organ in the human body?
  100. The ancient city of Machu Picchu is located in which South American country?

  101. What phenomenon is described by Moore’s Law, observed in the field of computer hardware development?

  102. The historic Cliffs of Moher are located in which European country?

  103. Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence of the United States?

  104. Name the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, awarded in 1921 for her novel “The Age of Innocence.”

  105. What is the scientific term for a substance that cannot be chemically broken down into simpler substances, consisting of atoms with the same number of protons?

  106. In music, who composed the Brandenburg Concertos, a collection of six works presented to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, in 1721?

  107. Which blood type is known as the universal donor type in the ABO blood group system?

  108. The ancient city of Timbuktu is located in which modern-day African country?

  109. What is the name of the process where a liquid changes to a gas at a temperature below its boiling point?

  110. Who is known for the creation of the modern periodic table, significantly improving upon Dmitri Mendeleev’s earlier version?

  111. Identify the explorer who completed the first recorded circumnavigation of the Earth in the 16th century.

  112. In literature, who wrote the famous short story “The Tell-Tale Heart”?

  113. What large river flows through Paris, the capital city of France?

  114. Name the physicist who developed the first successful model of the atom in 1913, known as the Bohr model.

  115. Which historical figure is famously associated with the phrase “Let them eat cake,” although there’s no solid evidence she actually said it?

  116. The Terracotta Army was discovered near the tomb of which ancient Chinese emperor?

  117. What is the main language spoken in Brazil?

  118. Who was the first programmer, known for her work on Charles Babbage’s proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine?

  119. Identify the artist who painted “The Scream,” an iconic work of art symbolizing the anxiety of the human condition.

  120. What is the hardest naturally occurring mineral on Earth, commonly used in jewelry?

Answers

  1. Bats are the only mammals capable of true sustained flight.

  2. The Berlin Wall began to fall in 1989.

  3. Carbon has the highest melting and boiling points of all the elements.

  4. Ralph Ellison is the author of “Invisible Man.”

  5. The principal issue of the Hundred Years’ War was territorial claims over the French throne.

  6. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered the “I Have a Dream” speech.

  7. In computer science, “SQL” stands for Structured Query Language.

  8. Saturn is known for having the most extensive ring system.

  9. Vincent van Gogh painted “The Starry Night.”

  10. The Battle of Thermopylae was fought between the Greeks and the Persians.

  11. The Big Bang Theory proposes the universe has been expanding since its inception.

  12. Marie Curie was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, awarded in the field of Physics and later in Chemistry.

  13. The capital city of New Zealand is Wellington.

  14. The enzyme responsible for this conversion is Rubisco (Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase).

  15. In Greek mythology, Sisyphus was condemned to roll a boulder up a hill repeatedly.

  16. The Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia are credited with inventing the wheel.

  17. John Milton wrote “Paradise Lost.”

  18. The chemical symbol for gold is Au.

  19. Antonio Vivaldi composed “The Four Seasons.”

  20. The Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919.

  21. The transition point is known as the Kármán line.

  22. Albert Einstein developed the theory of general relativity.

  23. Vitamin K is crucial for blood clotting.

  24. The Rosetta Stone was written in three languages: Egyptian hieroglyphs, Demotic script, and Ancient Greek.

  25. The largest moon of Saturn is Titan.

  26. The Roman god of war is Mars.

  27. The capital city of Canada is Ottawa.

  28. Sir Isaac Newton proposed the three laws of motion.

  29. The Chernobyl disaster occurred in 1986.

  30. The Mariana Trench is located in the Pacific Ocean.

  31. The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus is known as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

  32. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky composed the music for “Swan Lake,” “The Nutcracker,” and “Sleeping Beauty.”

  33. The Phoenician alphabet is significant as an early form of alphabetic writing.

  34. The largest planet in our solar system is Jupiter.

  35. The code name for the Battle of Normandy was Operation Overlord.

  36. Plato wrote “Republic.”

  37. Hydrogen has the atomic number 1.

  38. The vertebral column, or spine, is responsible for protecting the spinal cord.

  39. Michelangelo Buonarroti sculpted “David.”

  40. The theory of evolution by natural selection was also conceived by Alfred Russel Wallace.

  41. The Nile River is the longest river in the world.

  42. Richard Nixon is the only U.S. president to have resigned from office.

  43. The process is known as photosynthesis.

  44. In Greek mythology, the goddess of wisdom is Athena.

  45. Ludwig van Beethoven, who was deaf in his later years, is famous for his Ninth Symphony.

  46. The Hagia Sophia is located in Istanbul, Turkey.

  47. George Orwell wrote “1984.”

  48. The element with atomic number 79 is Gold (Au).

  49. Yuri Gagarin was the first human in outer space.

  50. The Spanish Armada set sail in 1588.

  51. The “Father of Medicine” is Hippocrates.

  52. “The Last Supper” is located in Milan.

  53. The term for the fear of being out of mobile phone contact is Nomophobia.

  54. Nepal has the only non-rectangular national flag.

  55. Jane Austen is the author of “Pride and Prejudice.”

  56. The storming of the Bastille marks the start of the French Revolution.

  57. The main ingredient in traditional miso soup is miso paste, which is fermented soybean paste.

  58. The “Father of Geometry” is Euclid.

  59. The Chunnel connects England and France.

  60. In Norse mythology, the god of thunder is Thor.

  61. HTTP stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol.

  62. The first female Prime Minister of the UK was Margaret Thatcher.

  63. Guernica” was painted by Pablo Picasso.

  64. The smallest bone in the human body is the stapes.

  65. The periodic table was invented by Dmitri Mendeleev.

  66. The longest river in Asia is the Yangtze River.

  67. The musical instrument with 88 keys is the piano.

  68. Petra is located in Jordan.

  69. A polygon with eight sides is known as an octagon.

  70. Hamlet” was written by William Shakespeare.

  71. Vitamin D is primarily obtained through sunlight exposure.

  72. The Kremlin is located in Moscow, Russia.

  73. The primary gas in Earth’s atmosphere is nitrogen.

  74. The scientist who discovered the law of universal gravitation and the laws of motion is Sir Isaac Newton.

  75. The Greek god of wine is Dionysus.

  76. The Great Barrier Reef is located off the coast of Australia.

  77. The economic theory is known as Reaganomics or supply-side economics.

  78. The first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean was Amelia Earhart.

  79. The architect who designed the Guggenheim Museum in New York was Frank Lloyd Wright.

  80. The Rosetta Stone was crucial in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphs.

  81. The Great Wall of China is the longest wall in the world.

  82. The theory of relativity was developed by Albert Einstein.

  83. The first Roman Emperor was Augustus Caesar.

  84. Aldous Huxley wrote “Brave New World.”

  85. The capital city of Iceland is Reykjavik.

  86. Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

  87. The American Civil War began in 1861.

  88. An organism’s complete set of DNA is known as its genome.

  89. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed “The Marriage of Figaro.”

  90. The Renaissance primarily occurred during the 14th to 17th centuries.

  91. The Sahara Desert is located in Northern Africa.

  92. The Nobel Prizes were established by Alfred Nobel.

  93. The currency used in Japan is the Yen.

  94. The first woman to become Chancellor of Germany was Angela Merkel.

  95. The hierarchy of needs was developed by Abraham Maslow.

  96. The tallest mountain in the world, measured from sea level, is Mount Everest.

  97. The principle of buoyancy was formulated by Archimedes.

  98. Les Misérables” was written by Victor Hugo.

  99. The largest internal organ in the human body is the liver.

  100. Machu Picchu is located in Peru.

  101. Moore’s Law describes the phenomenon where the number of transistors on a microchip doubles approximately every two years, leading to an increase in computational power.

  102. The Cliffs of Moher are located in Ireland.

  103. The primary author of the Declaration of Independence was Thomas Jefferson.

  104. The first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction was Edith Wharton.

  105. A substance that cannot be chemically broken down into simpler substances is an element.

  106. The Brandenburg Concertos were composed by Johann Sebastian Bach.

  107. Blood type O negative is known as the universal donor type.

  108. Timbuktu is located in Mali.

  109. The process where a liquid changes to a gas at a temperature below its boiling point is evaporation.

  110. The modern periodic table was significantly improved by Glenn T. Seaborg.

  111. The explorer who completed the first recorded circumnavigation of the Earth was Ferdinand Magellan.

  112. The Tell-Tale Heart” was written by Edgar Allan Poe.

  113. The large river flowing through Paris is the Seine.

  114. The physicist who developed the Bohr model of the atom was Niels Bohr.

  115. The historical figure famously associated with “Let them eat cake” is Marie Antoinette.

  116. The Terracotta Army was discovered near the tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.

  117. The main language spoken in Brazil is Portuguese.

  118. The first programmer is often acknowledged to be Ada Lovelace.

  119. The Scream” was painted by Edvard Munch.

  120. The hardest naturally occurring mineral on Earth is diamond.
120 trivia questions for adults

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